Hill Country ResidenceHill Country Residence
Cornerstone ArchitectsCornerstone Architects
Nestled into sloping topography, the design of this home allows privacy from the street while providing unique vistas throughout the house and to the surrounding hill country and downtown skyline. Layering rooms with each other as well as circulation galleries, insures seclusion while allowing stunning downtown views. The owners' goals of creating a home with a contemporary flow and finish while providing a warm setting for daily life was accomplished through mixing warm natural finishes such as stained wood with gray tones in concrete and local limestone. The home's program also hinged around using both passive and active green features. Sustainable elements include geothermal heating/cooling, rainwater harvesting, spray foam insulation, high efficiency glazing, recessing lower spaces into the hillside on the west side, and roof/overhang design to provide passive solar coverage of walls and windows. The resulting design is a sustainably balanced, visually pleasing home which reflects the lifestyle and needs of the clients. Photography by Andrew Pogue
Palouse ResidencePalouse Residence
Uptic StudiosUptic Studios
An efficient floor plan and modest structure designed for a young couple to blend in with the surrounding farming community. The expansive south and east facing glass captures incredible views form every room in the loft-like living area. The timber columns and overbuilt awnings further defines the appearance of a dilapidated barn from the casual passersby.
Mazama HouseMazama House
FINNE ArchitectsFINNE Architects
The Mazama house is located in the Methow Valley of Washington State, a secluded mountain valley on the eastern edge of the North Cascades, about 200 miles northeast of Seattle. The house has been carefully placed in a copse of trees at the easterly end of a large meadow. Two major building volumes indicate the house organization. A grounded 2-story bedroom wing anchors a raised living pavilion that is lifted off the ground by a series of exposed steel columns. Seen from the access road, the large meadow in front of the house continues right under the main living space, making the living pavilion into a kind of bridge structure spanning over the meadow grass, with the house touching the ground lightly on six steel columns. The raised floor level provides enhanced views as well as keeping the main living level well above the 3-4 feet of winter snow accumulation that is typical for the upper Methow Valley. To further emphasize the idea of lightness, the exposed wood structure of the living pavilion roof changes pitch along its length, so the roof warps upward at each end. The interior exposed wood beams appear like an unfolding fan as the roof pitch changes. The main interior bearing columns are steel with a tapered “V”-shape, recalling the lightness of a dancer. The house reflects the continuing FINNE investigation into the idea of crafted modernism, with cast bronze inserts at the front door, variegated laser-cut steel railing panels, a curvilinear cast-glass kitchen counter, waterjet-cut aluminum light fixtures, and many custom furniture pieces. The house interior has been designed to be completely integral with the exterior. The living pavilion contains more than twelve pieces of custom furniture and lighting, creating a totality of the designed environment that recalls the idea of Gesamtkunstverk, as seen in the work of Josef Hoffman and the Viennese Secessionist movement in the early 20th century. The house has been designed from the start as a sustainable structure, with 40% higher insulation values than required by code, radiant concrete slab heating, efficient natural ventilation, large amounts of natural lighting, water-conserving plumbing fixtures, and locally sourced materials. Windows have high-performance LowE insulated glazing and are equipped with concealed shades. A radiant hydronic heat system with exposed concrete floors allows lower operating temperatures and higher occupant comfort levels. The concrete slabs conserve heat and provide great warmth and comfort for the feet. Deep roof overhangs, built-in shades and high operating clerestory windows are used to reduce heat gain in summer months. During the winter, the lower sun angle is able to penetrate into living spaces and passively warm the exposed concrete floor. Low VOC paints and stains have been used throughout the house. The high level of craft evident in the house reflects another key principle of sustainable design: build it well and make it last for many years! Photo by Benjamin Benschneider
Floating HouseFloating House
Footprint Architects LtdFootprint Architects Ltd
The key design driver for the project was to create a simple but contemporary extension that responded to the existing dramatic topography in the property’s rear garden. The concept was to provide a single elegant form, cantilevering out into the tree canopies and over the landscape. Conceived as a house within the tree canopies the extension is clad in sweet chestnut which enhances the relationship to the surrounding mature trees. Large sliding glass panels link the inside spaces to its unique environment. Internally the design successfully resolves the Client’s brief to provide an open plan and fluid layout, that subtly defines distinct living and dining areas. The scheme was completed in April 2016
Flinders RanchFlinders Ranch
Destination LivingDestination Living
The brief for this project was for the house to be at one with its surroundings. Integrating harmoniously into its coastal setting a focus for the house was to open it up to allow the light and sea breeze to breathe through the building. The first floor seems almost to levitate above the landscape by minimising the visual bulk of the ground floor through the use of cantilevers and extensive glazing. The contemporary lines and low lying form echo the rolling country in which it resides.
Heavy MetalHeavy Metal
HufftHufft
The integrated master bed and night stand float off a walnut clad wall. Photography by Andrew Fabin
Menlo ModMenlo Mod
Mansfield + O'NeilMansfield + O'Neil
John Lum Architecture Paul Dyer Photography
Living with house doctorLiving with house doctor
UserUser
House FHouse F
Ippolito Fleitz Group – Identity ArchitectsIppolito Fleitz Group – Identity Architects
FOTOGRAFIE Bruno Helbling Quellenstraße 31 8005 Zürich Switzerland T +41 44 271 05 21 F +41 44 271 05 31 hello@Helblingfotografie.ch
Hill Country ResidenceHill Country Residence
Cornerstone ArchitectsCornerstone Architects
Nestled into sloping topography, the design of this home allows privacy from the street while providing unique vistas throughout the house and to the surrounding hill country and downtown skyline. Layering rooms with each other as well as circulation galleries, insures seclusion while allowing stunning downtown views. The owners' goals of creating a home with a contemporary flow and finish while providing a warm setting for daily life was accomplished through mixing warm natural finishes such as stained wood with gray tones in concrete and local limestone. The home's program also hinged around using both passive and active green features. Sustainable elements include geothermal heating/cooling, rainwater harvesting, spray foam insulation, high efficiency glazing, recessing lower spaces into the hillside on the west side, and roof/overhang design to provide passive solar coverage of walls and windows. The resulting design is a sustainably balanced, visually pleasing home which reflects the lifestyle and needs of the clients. Photography by Andrew Pogue
Modern Loft KitchenModern Loft Kitchen
Croma Design Inc.Croma Design Inc.
Airy, light and bright were the mandates for this modern loft kitchen, as featured in Style At Home magazine, and toured on Cityline. Texture is brought in through the concrete floors, the brick exterior walls, and the main focal point of the full height stone tile backsplash. Mark Burstyn Photography

Concrete Floor Designs & Ideas

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