63rd Avenue Residence

Pepper Watkins

—  Houzz
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This photo has 1 question
hjgada wrote:26 August 2017
  • hjgada
    3 years ago
    Pls rpy is it load bearing wall?
  • PRO
    Cornerstone Design Studio India
    3 years ago
    Which wall you are referring to ? There are many walls in the design.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

joaniebelair
Joanie Belair added this to Chautauqua7 September 2019

The kitchen in the 1930s Washington, D.C., home that architect Mark Lawrence inherited from his grandmother used to have linoleum, and the dining area featured a solid oak floor. After tearing down the walls separating the two rooms, he didn’t have the budget for new wood flooring in the kitchen. Since the pine subfloor under the linoleum lined up with the oak and was in great shape, he decided to use it as his finished floor. He had everything sanded down and applied turquoise Minwax stain to both materials.

ejaycox
ejaycox added this to Kitchen shortlist12 August 2018

Sink cabinet on legs and Minwaxed pine subfloor

autochix
autochix added this to Ryan6 January 2018

The kitchen in the 1930s Washington, D.C., home that architect Mark Lawrence inherited from his grandmother used to have linoleum, and the dining area featured a solid oak floor. After tearing down the walls separating the two rooms, he didn’t have the budget for new wood flooring in the kitchen. Since the pine subfloor under the linoleum lined up with the oak and was in great shape, he decided to use it as his finished floor. He had everything sanded down and applied turquoise Minwax stain to both materials. Considerations Nicks and scratches: Subfloors are old, sometimes 100 years old or more, and have hardened over time. But they are still softwoods and are more susceptible to scratches and dings than other wood floors. “Old pine is still softer than an oak,” Paprocki says. “It will get more nicked and leave more impressions.” Area rugs can protect the wood, or you can embrace that these floors won’t stay perfect. Transitions: In some instances, the height of the subfloor lines up perfectly with the surrounding flooring, as it had originally been covered with an especially thin material. Other times, you may need to create a transition between the room with the subfloor and the surrounding rooms. “There are always floor height transitions to pay attention to,” says Cameron Habel, contractor and president of Cameron C. Habel Construction in Oakland, California.Dirt and dust: Dirt and dust will most likely find their way into cracks and gaps in the wood, even after patching or filling. If you have a living space or basement below without a finished ceiling, dirt and dust may float down into that room. Heat loss: Although dirt and dust can be a concern if these floors are above a basement with an unfinished ceiling, heat loss is not, as the home’s envelope is still intact. If these floors sit above a space that is otherwise open to the environment, you can add insulation beneath the floors.

humblyheather
Heather Brenneman added this to Can't Stand the Heat1 October 2017

Turquoise MinWax Stain On subfloor in kitchen